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Key Media Mentions for March 2013


Sunday, Mar. 31, 2013


 

A few recent Media Highlights (March 2013):

Aggies Prep for NFL Draft at Pro Day – Deseret News, March 7

The NFL Draft is still almost two months away, but for Aggie NFL hopefuls the hard part is over.
 

Utah State held its annual pro day Thursday morning in front of scouts from the Broncos, Browns, Chargers, Colts, Dolphins, Eagles, 49ers, Panthers, Raiders, Seahawks and the CFL's BC Lions. USU’s Kerwynn Williams and Will Davis headlined the group and participated in a few field drills, but mostly let their work at the NFL Scouting Combine speak for itself.
 

“Right now, it’s pretty (clear) you’ve reached the top of the hill with this whole process,” Williams said. “I’m pretty much coasting on the other side right now. All I can do is stay in shape and if anyone calls me for workouts or anything like that, then I have to be ready to go out there and perform.”
 

While Williams and Davis established themselves for scouts at the combine, the rest of the Aggies at pro day were looking to make names for themselves.
 

Matt Austin, the Aggies' leading wide receiver last year, is on the fringe of being drafted and is hoping that he proved himself worthy of a roster spot in the NFL on Thursday.


USU Grad Student, Researchers Collect Project Data at South Pole – Herald Journal, March 7

Standing outside the base at the South Pole one January day, USU student Jonathan Pugmire braved the minus 50-degree weather to snap a few pictures — without gloves. But the numbing temperatures had him retreat indoors after only a few pictures.
 

It was just one of the memories Pugmire has of spending between Jan. 11 and 31 in the southernmost continent to continue research that Utah State University and others have been committed to for years.

 

With a 2006 NSF grant, USU physicist Mike Taylor and colleagues designed the Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper — AMTM — to capture images of gravity waves some 50 miles above the polar surface. It was installed by Taylor and a USU team in 2010.
 

Pugmire, who conducted undergraduate work at USU and is now pursuing his Ph.D. in atmospheric physics, called the trip “pretty amazing.”
 

Pugmire’s trip was focused on collecting data from AMTM, as well as teaching the technicians who live there year-round how to operate the camera. These technicians do this and monitor the experiments of hundreds of other scientific teams.
 

Senate Oks Bill Renaming College of Eastern Utah – Daily Herald, March 8

The Utah Senate has approved legislation to change the name of Utah State University-College of Eastern Utah to Utah State University Eastern.
 

The college, which was established in 1937, has campuses in Price and Blanding.
 

It was known as the College of Eastern Utah until 2010, when it merged with Utah State.
 

The school's Chancellor Joe Peterson says the school wanted a shorter name and the school is often referred to as Utah State University Eastern or USU Eastern.
 

The Senate approved the legislation unanimously Friday. It now moves to the House for consideration.


Jessop Named 2013 Madeleine Award winner for Contributions to Arts in Utah – Herald Journal, March 14

A Utah State University dean has been awarded the 2013 Madeleine Award for Distinguished Service to the Arts and Humanities.
 

Craig Jessop, the founding dean of the Caine College of the Arts and the former director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, was named this year’s winner of the annual award by the Madeleine Arts and Humanities Council Chairman Mike Stransky.
 

The award is given to individuals who have made “comprehensive and long-term contributions to the arts and humanities in Utah.” It was first presented in 1989.
 

Jessop also serves as the founder and director of the American Festival Chorus and Orchestra and has served as the music director of the Carnegie Hall National High School Choral Festival, which is sponsored by the Weill Institute of Music at Carnegie Hall.


Former Utah State University President Stan Cazier Dies – Salt Lake Tribune, March 18

In his 13 years as Utah State University president, Stanford Cazier presided over an era of expansion of the school’s student body and its research, especially in space and education.
 

"People don’t often think of Utah State as a great research university, but it is," said Blyth Ahlstrom, an assistant provost emeritus who worked closely with Cazier for decades.
 

Cazier died last week at age 82.
 

Trained as a history professor with a master’s degree from the University of Utah and a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin, Cazier was an electrifying lecturer, said USU professor emeritus Ross Peterson, who had Cazier as a professor when he was a student in the 1960s.
 

"He made it really, really exciting," he said. "In that day, you didn’t have a lot of media. I’m not sure there was even an overhead projector. It was just how you told the story, the history, how you got people excited about the ideas."


Albrecht: No Tier II tuition Hike at USU – Herald Journal, March 19

Utah State University President Stan Albrecht announced Monday there would be no increase in tuition for students for the upcoming academic year — the first time since 2001.
 

The decision stems from a March 8 meeting of the USU Board of Trustees, which approved a zero to 2 percent increase in Tier II tuition — a tuition level managed by Utah’s individual institutions.
 

“The Trustees approved that the president/university could ask for anything between zero and 2 percent, and he (Albrecht) decided zero,” Vitale wrote in an email.
 

Subsequently, Albrecht canceled a Tier II public hearing at USU — required by him before a tuition increase is implemented — that had been scheduled for Wednesday.
 

The only increase at USU will come if a Tier 1 increase is approved by the Board of Regents — the governing board of all public colleges and universities in Utah — at its March 29 meeting, said Pam Silberman, spokeswoman for the Utah System of Higher Education.
 

Tier I affects all of Utah’s public colleges and universities.


Study Says Marriage Thrives on Shared Chores, Strong Dad-Child Bond – Deseret News, March 19

Husbands who work alongside their wives on household tasks and who participate in child rearing are more apt to be in marriages described by both spouses as happy and high-quality, according to researchers from BYU, the University of Missouri and Utah State University.
 

The researchers also found that the "very strongest effect" on whether either moms or dads viewed the marriage as happy was the woman's perception of the quality of dad's relationship with the kids, whether dad and the kids adore each other, said Erin Holmes, an assistant professor in the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University. The next factor was the wife's perception of how her husband takes care of the kids, whether dad helps her with them.
 

The researchers measured paternal involvement in various ways, including playing with the children, sharing interests with them and finding teaching moments.


USU Eastern Researchers Find Giant Clams, One to be Displayed in Logan – Herald Journal, March 20

David Liddell walks through a room in the Geology Building at Utah State University, which houses some interesting fossils, minerals and other prehistoric artifacts. Among them is a giant dinosaur leg bone and a mammoth tusk found in a gravel pit near Providence.
 

But the one artifact Liddell is raving about these days has yet to be hung on display in the up-and-coming museum, expected to open this fall: A 4-by-5-foot clam that was recently discovered in Utah by USU Eastern Prehistoric Museum personnel.
 

In scientific terms, it’s called the Platyceramus — or in pedestrian terms, “flat clam.”
 

“It took five of us to carry that up to here from the parking lot,” Liddell said Monday as he inspected the clam, now encased in a wooden frame. “That’s a workout.”
 

The clams were found eroding out of the Mancos Shale that sits at the foot of the Book Cliffs by Kenneth Carpenter, paleontologist and director of the USU Eastern museum, and colleague Lloyd Logan, director of education and exhibits. The two were hiking near Green River, outside Price.


(Deseret News, 03/07/2013)
(Herald Journal, 03/07/2013)
(Daily Herald, 03/08/2013)
(Herald Journal, 03/14/2013)
(Salt Lake Tribune, 03/18/2013)
(Herald Journal, 03/19/2013)
(Deseret News, 03/19/2013)
(Herald Journal, 03/20/2013)
(PR & Marketing, 03/31/2013)

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